Seeds of South Australia
Ceratogyne obionoides (Compositae)
Wingwort
List of species for Ceratogyne
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Seed collecting:
October to November
Herbarium regions:
Gairdner-Torrens, Eyre Peninsula
NRM regions:
Eyre Peninsula, South Australian Arid Lands
IBRA regions
Eyre Hills (EYB03)Eyre Yorke Block
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [common after winter rains]
Eyre Mallee (EYB05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [common after winter rains]
Myall Plains (GAW01)Gawler
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [common after winter rains]
Gawler Volcanics (GAW02) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [common after winter rains]
Kingoonya (GAW05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Yellabinna (GVD06)Great Victoria Desert
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Ceratogyne]
Name derivation:
Ceratogyne from the Greek 'keratos' meaning a horn and 'gyne' meaning female; referring to the horn-like appendages on the achene. Obionoides meaning resembling the genus Obione; may be referring to the similarity of the genus fruiting clusters and fruit shape being similar in profile to Obione pedunculata.
Distribution:
Found on the upper Eyre Peninsula in South Australia, growing on sandhills. Also found in Western Australia, New South Wales and Victoria..
Status:
Native. Uncommon in South Australia. Rare in New South Wales and Victoria. Common in Western Australia.
Plant description:
Annual or ephemeral herb to 15 cm high with several ascending, unbranched or few-branching, hairy stems. Leaves green or red. Basal leaves oblanceolate, attenuate at the base, to 18 mm long and 4 mm wide, entire, pubescent with a prominent mid-vein, stem leaves oblanceolate to oblong, acute,  to 10 mm long and 3 mm wide, entire, pubescent. Flowers yellow. Flowering between September and November. 
Fruit type:
Red to brown loose clustered head.
Seed type:
Red to brown, horse head-shaped seed to 4 mm long and 1.5 mm wide, margin curved inward with two horn-like projections, covered in scattered hairs.
Embryo type:
Spatulate.
Seed collecting:
Collect seeds that are maturing, turning red or brown by plucking it off with your fingers. Mature seeds are easily removed.
Seed cleaning:
Place the seeds in a tray for a week to dry. No further cleaning is required if only the seeds are collected. If collected with other material, then use a sieve to separate any unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was average, at 70%.