Seeds of South Australia
Chondropyxis halophila (Compositae)
Salt Button-daisy
List of species for Chondropyxis
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Seed collecting:
November to January
Herbarium region:
Eyre Peninsula
NRM region:
Eyre Peninsula
IBRA region
Eyre Mallee (EYB05)Eyre Yorke Block
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [under-coll., habitat specific, salt lakes]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Chondropyxis]
Name derivation:
Chondropyxis from the Greek 'chondros' meaning a cartilage and 'pyxis' meaning a box; referring to the fruiting capitulum which consists of persistent cartilaginous scales holding the achenes on the receptacle. Halophila means salt loving; referring to the species habitat.
Distribution:
Found only from the salt lakes between Penong and Point Sinclair in South Australia, growing on gypseous soils at margins of salt lakes. Also found in Western Australia.
Status:
Native. Rare in South Australia. Uncommon in Western Australia.
Plant description:
Compact herb to 7 cm high with regularly cymose-branched, glabrous stems. Leaves subamplexicaul, linear and entire or rarely dilated near the apex with a single lateral lobe, to 35 mm long and 1.5 mm wide, subterete, succulent, glabrous, green. Flower-heads borne at successive levels, the uppermost overtopped by the leaves, the others in the dichotomous forks of branches with straw-coloured daisy-flowers. Flowering between September and October.
Fruit type:
Small straw-coloured daisy-head, receptacle and scales persistent and hardened in fruit, retaining the fertile achenes except for the outermost.
Seed type:
Yellow ovoid achenes to 2 mm long and 1 mm wide, covered in hairs.
Embryo type:
Spatulate fully developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect heads or whole plants that are brown or turning brown. Each head should have numerous tiny seeds.
Seed cleaning:
Place the heads in a tray for a week to dry. Then rub the heads gently with your hands to dislodge the seeds. Use a fine sieve to separate the seeds from the unwanted material. The seeds are tiny dark brown and ovoid in shape. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Germination table:
DateResultT0T50Pre-treatment | Germination medium | Incubator: Photoperiod / Thermoperiod
October 201593%7d7d None
1% water agar
Incubated under winter conditions
October 201576%7d14d None
1% water agar
Incubated under spring/autumn conditions
October 201573%7d7d Soak in 500 mg/L gibberellic acid for 48 hrs
1% water agar
Incubated under spring/autumn conditions
October 201570%7d7d Soak in 500 mg/L gibberellic acid for 48 hrs
1% water agar
Result: Maximum percentage of germination observed.
T0: Number of days before first germinant observed.
T50: Number of days to achieve 50% germination.
Pre-treatment: The initial treatment that the seeds received prior to placement on germination media.
Germination medium: The substrate that seeds were placed on for the duration of the germination experiment.
Incubator conditions:
Photoperiod: The duration of light exposure that the seeds were subject to during a 24 hour period.
Thermoperiod: The constant or diurnal temperatures that seeds were subject to during a 24 hour period.
Winter conditions: 15°C 20 h (3am→11pm); 5°C 4 h (11pm→3am) / 10 h light (8am→6pm); 14 h dark (6pm→8am)
Spring/Autumn conditions: 22°C 12 h (8am→8pm); 10°C 12 h (8pm→8am) / 12 h light (8am→8pm); 12 h dark (8pm→8am)
Summer conditions: 30°C 14 h (6am→8pm); 15°C 10 h (8pm→6am) / 14 h light (6am→8pm); 10 h dark (8pm→6am)