Seeds of South Australia
Crotalaria eremaea ssp. eremaea (Leguminosae)
Bluebush Pea
List of species for Crotalaria
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Seed collecting:
September to November
Herbarium regions:
Lake Eyre, Gairdner-Torrens, Flinders Ranges, Eastern
NRM region:
South Australian Arid Lands
IBRA regions
SUMMARY
Olary Spur (FLB03)Flinders Lofty Block
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i))   [toxic to stock, on dunes, southern edge of dist, sandy dunes]
Northern Flinders (FLB05) 
 Least Concern
Central Flinders (FLB06) 
 Least Concern
Braemer (MDD07)Murray Darling Depression
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i))
Gawler Lakes (GAW03)Gawler
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [southern limit]
Arcoona Plateau (GAW04) 
 Least Concern
Torrens (GAW06) 
 Least Concern
Roxby (GAW07) 
 Least Concern
Commonwealth Hill (GAW08) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Barrier Range (BHC01)Broken Hill Complex
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i))
Curnamona (BHC06) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i))
Simpson Desert (SSD02)Simpson Strzelecki Dunefields
 Least Concern
Dieri (SSD03) 
 Least Concern
Warriner (SSD04) 
 Near Threatened
Strzelecki Desert (SSD05) 
 Least Concern
Breakaways (STP01)Stony Plains
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Oodnadatta (STP02) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Murnpeowie (STP03) 
 Least Concern
Peake-Dennison Inlier (STP04) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Macumba (STP05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Witjira (STP06) 
 Least Concern
Baltana (STP07) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Sturt Stony Desert (CHC02)Channel Country
 Least Concern
Diamantina-Eyre (CHC04) 
 Least Concern
Coongie (CHC06) 
 Least Concern
Lake Pure (CHC07) 
 Least Concern
Pedirka (FIN04)Finke
 Near Threatened
IBRA regions
DISPLAY ALL
3 of 6 subregionsFlinders Lofty BlockLeast Concern
, Rare
Braemer (MDD07)Murray Darling DepressionRare
  (IUCN: RA d(i))
5 of 8 subregionsGawlerLeast Concern
, Rare
2 of 4 subregionsBroken Hill ComplexRare
4 of 4 subregionsSimpson Strzelecki DunefieldsLeast Concern
, Near Threatened
7 of 7 subregionsStony PlainsLeast Concern
, Rare
4 of 4 subregionsChannel CountryLeast Concern
Pedirka (FIN04)FinkeNear Threatened
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Crotalaria]
Name derivation:
Crotalaria from the Greek 'crotalon' meaning a rattle, castanet; referring to the sound the dried seed pods make when shaken. Eremaea from the Greek 'eremaios' a poetic word for solitary; referring to the flowers being terminal on shoots.
Distribution:
Found in the north-east corner of South Australia, growing in sandy soil. Also found Northern Territory, Queensland and New South Wales.
Status:
Native. Common in South Australia. Common in the other states.
Plant description:
Softwooded shrubs to 1 m high, densely grey-tomentose. Leaflets commonly oblong, 1 or often 3, the laterals if present reduced and sometimes very small or, if approaching the terminal in shape, very rarely more than half its length, all rather thin, not obviously wrinkled on drying, densely to sparsely pubescent but always with some hairs on the upper surface, the hairs appressed to spreading and usually denser below than above. Flowers loosely spaced in terminal racemes with yellow pea-flowers. Flowering mainly between August and September. This subspecies differ from Crotalaria eremaea ssp. strehlowii by being hairy.
Fruit type:
Pale brown narrow-obovate pod to 30 mm long and 7 mm.
Seed type:
Orange reinform seed to 6 mm long and 3 mm wide with a smooth surface.
Embryo type:
Bent.
Seed collecting:
Collect mature pods, those that are fat, turning brown and contain hard seeds.
Seed cleaning:
Place the pods in a tray and leave to dry for one to two weeks. Then use a rubber bung to rub the pods or break the pods open with your fingers to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was high, at 95%.
Seed germination:
This species has physical dormancy that needs to be overcome for the seed to germinate (e.g. nicking or softening the seed coat).