Seeds of South Australia
Darwinia micropetala (Myrtaceae)
Small Darwinia
List of species for Darwinia
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Seed collecting:
October to December
Herbarium regions:
Kangaroo Island, South Eastern
NRM regions:
Kangaroo Island, South East
IBRA regions
Bridgewater (NCP01)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Least Concern
Lucindale (NCP03) 
 Least Concern
Tintinara (NCP04) 
 Least Concern
Kangaroo Island (KAN01)Kanmantoo
 Least Concern   [widespread and stable]
Murray Lakes and Coorong (MDD03)Murray Darling Depression
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [edge of range]
Lowan Mallee (MDD04) 
 Regionally Extinct   [presumed extinct; edge of range; likes saline ground]
Wimmera (MDD05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [edge of range]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Darwinia]
Name derivation:
Darwinia named after Dr Erasmus Darwin (1731-1802), an English physician, poet and grandfather of the great naturalist, Charles Darwin. Micropetala from the Greek 'mikros' meaning small and 'petalum' meaning petal; referring to the species small flowers. 
Distribution:
Found on Kangaroo Island and the South-east in South Australia, growing in swales and around the edges of lakes, often with Melaleuca brevifolia. Also found in Victoria.
Status:
Native. Common in South Australia. Rare in Victoria.
Plant description:
Small erect wiry shrub to 50 cm high. Leaves grey-green, opposite, to 3 mm long and 0.5 mm wide, linear and triquetrous to obovate and concavo-convex, warty surface. Inflorescence in small terminal compound head borne in upper leaf axils with white flowers. Flowering between June and October.
Fruit type:
Small, brown nut-like fruit enclosed in the hypanthium and crowned by persistent sepals and petals.
Seed collecting:
Collect fruit heads that are darkening, turning brown and drying off. Rub the flower parts in your palm to see if there is any seed.
Seed cleaning:
Place the heads in a tray and leave to dry for a week. Then rub the heads with your hands or a rubber bung to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.