Seeds of South Australia
Anthosachne scabra (Gramineae)
Common Wheat-grass
List of species for Anthosachne
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Seed collecting:
October to February
Herbarium regions:
Nullarbor, Gairdner-Torrens, Flinders Ranges, Eastern, Eyre Peninsula, Northern Lofty, Murray, Yorke Peninsula, Southern Lofty, Kangaroo Island, South Eastern
NRM regions:
Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, Alinytjara Wilurara, Eyre Peninsula, Kangaroo Island, Northern and Yorke, South Australian Arid Lands, South Australian Murray-Darling Basin, South East
IBRA regions
SUMMARY
Mount Gambier (SVP02)Southern Volcanic Plain
 Near Threatened
Bridgewater (NCP01)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Near Threatened
Glenelg Plain (NCP02) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Lucindale (NCP03) 
 Near Threatened
Tintinara (NCP04) 
 Near Threatened   [undercollected ]
Kangaroo Island (KAN01)Kanmantoo
 Near Threatened   [(no records in BDBSA) comes up on roadsides]
Fleurieu (KAN02) 
 Least Concern   [comes up on roadsides; often seen]
Mount Lofty Ranges (FLB01)Flinders Lofty Block
 Least Concern   [grassy ecosystem sp; comes up on roadsides; often seen]
Broughton (FLB02) 
 Least Concern   (Probable Decline)
Olary Spur (FLB03) 
 Least Concern   (Probable Decline)
Southern Flinders (FLB04) 
 Least Concern   (Probable Decline)
Northern Flinders (FLB05) 
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [restricted; could be declining]
Central Flinders (FLB06) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Southern Yorke (EYB01)Eyre Yorke Block
 Least Concern   (Probable Decline)
St Vincent (EYB02) 
 Least Concern   (Probable Decline)
Eyre Hills (EYB03) 
 Least Concern
Talia (EYB04) 
 Least Concern
Eyre Mallee (EYB05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [atypical habitat]
Murray Mallee (MDD02)Murray Darling Depression
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Murray Lakes and Coorong (MDD03) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   (Probable Decline)   [limited habitat]
Wimmera (MDD05) 
 Least Concern
Braemer (MDD07) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Murray Scroll Belt (RIV06)Riverina
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Myall Plains (GAW01)Gawler
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [atypical habitat]
Gawler Volcanics (GAW02) 
 Least Concern
Gawler Lakes (GAW03) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Nullarbor Plain (NUL02)Nullarbor
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Barrier Range (BHC01)Broken Hill Complex
 Least Concern
IBRA regions
DISPLAY ALL
Mount Gambier (SVP02)Southern Volcanic PlainNear Threatened
4 of 4 subregionsNaracoorte Coastal PlainNear Threatened
, Rare
2 of 2 subregionsKanmantooLeast Concern
, Near Threatened
6 of 6 subregionsFlinders Lofty BlockLeast Concern
, Rare
, Vulnerable
5 of 5 subregionsEyre Yorke BlockLeast Concern
, Rare
4 of 6 subregionsMurray Darling DepressionLeast Concern
, Rare
Murray Scroll Belt (RIV06)RiverinaRare
  (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
3 of 8 subregionsGawlerLeast Concern
, Rare
Nullarbor Plain (NUL02)NullarborRare
  (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Barrier Range (BHC01)Broken Hill ComplexLeast Concern
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Anthosachne]
Name derivation:
Anthosachne from the Greek 'anthos' meaning flower and 'achne' meaning scale; referring to the upper florets of the spikelet being sterile. Scaba from the Latin 'scaber' meaning rough or scaly rough; referring plant covered with hard short rigid points
Distribution:
Found in the southern part of South Australia, from the Eyre Peninsula to the lower South-east, growing in a variety of habitats and soil types. Also found in all states except in the Northern territory.
Status:
Native. Common in South Australia. Common in the other states.
Plant description:
Tall weeping perennial grass with erect or arching culms to 120 cm tall. Leaves mostly basal with blades narrow, fiat or filiform, scabrous on the edges. Inflorescence a 25 cm spike with numerous fertile spikelets on each. Flowering between July and December.
Fruit type:
Brown spike-head containing numerous individual seeds.
Embryo type:
Lateral.
Seed collecting:
Use hands to gently strip seeds off the mature seed spike that are turning straw colour. Mature seeds will come off easily. Alternatively, you can break off the whole seed spike.
Seed cleaning:
Place the seeds/spike in a tray and leave to dry for two weeks. No further cleaning is required if only seed collected. If seed spikes collected, use hand to strip off the mature seeds. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.