Seeds of South Australia
Erodiophyllum elderi (Compositae)
Koonamore Daisy
List of species for Erodiophyllum
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Seed collecting:
October to May
Herbarium regions:
Lake Eyre, Nullarbor, Flinders Ranges, Eastern, Eyre Peninsula, Northern Lofty, Murray
NRM regions:
Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, Alinytjara Wilurara, Eyre Peninsula, South Australian Arid Lands
IBRA regions
Broughton (FLB02)Flinders Lofty Block
 Data Deficient   [Grazing a threat. Edge of range.]
Olary Spur (FLB03) 
 Least Concern   [Grazing a threat]
Southern Flinders (FLB04) 
 Data Deficient   [Grazing a threat. Edge of range.]
Northern Flinders (FLB05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [edge of range]
Central Flinders (FLB06) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [edge of range]
South Olary Plain (MDD01)Murray Darling Depression
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [edge of range]
Braemer (MDD07) 
 Least Concern   [Grazing a threat]
Myall Plains (GAW01)Gawler
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   (Probable Decline)
Gawler Lakes (GAW03) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   (Probable Decline)
Arcoona Plateau (GAW04) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   (Probable Decline)
Nullarbor Plain (NUL02)Nullarbor
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Curnamona (BHC06)Broken Hill Complex
 Least Concern   [Grazing a threat]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Erodiophyllum]
Name derivation:
Erodiophyllum from the genus Erodium and the Greek 'phyllon' meaning leaf; referring to the resemblance of the leaves to those of some Erodium species. Elderi named after Sir Thomas Elder (1818-1897), a Scottish-Australian pastoralist, highly successful businessman, philanthropist, politician, race-horse owner and breeder, and public figure.
Distribution:
Found mainly in the eastern part of South Australia with old records from the west and north-east, growing on alluvial floodplains in mulga shrubland with chenopods. Also found in Western Australia and New South Wales.
Status:
Native. Common in South Australia. Very rare in New South Wales. Uncommon in Western Australia.
Plant description:
Rough-hairy perennial forb with stout erect stems. Leaves to 10 cm long and 3 cm wide, deeply lobed and broad-toothed, bright green, hairy. Flower-heads on thick hairy stems with a large blue-violet or white daisy with yellow centre at the end. Flowering between April and November.
Fruit type:
Hard, woody, brown egg-shaped fruit-head to 25 mm long, covered with rigid spreading points.
Seed type:
Pale brown arrow-shaped seed to 4 mm long and 2 mm wide.
Embryo type:
Spatulate fully developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect maturing heads, those that are fat, hard and turning brown. Fruit-heads can be picked from the stalk or collected from the ground. Be careful as fruit-heads can be spiny.
Seed cleaning:
Place the fruit-heads in a tray and leave to dry for at least two weeks. No further cleaning is required if only fruit-heads were collected. Each fruit-heads contain numerous seeds. Store the whole fruit-heads with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From two collections, the seed viability were high, at 100%.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA 
MSB
51300 (2201 g)
28000 (1344 g)
100+17-Oct-2007DJD90919-Sep-2008100%-18°C
BGA9000 (251.55 g)20027-May-2010KHB420
Eastern
1-Jan-2012NCT
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.