Seeds of South Australia
Eryngium supinum (Umbelliferae)
Little Devil
List of species for Eryngium
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Seed collecting:
September to December
Herbarium region:
Lake Eyre
NRM region:
South Australian Arid Lands
IBRA regions
Baltana (STP07)Stony Plains
 Near Threatened
Diamantina-Eyre (CHC04)Channel Country
 Near Threatened
Coongie (CHC06) 
 Near Threatened
Mann-Musgrave Block (CER01)Central Ranges
 Data Deficient   [(no records) recorded as E vesiculosum]
Everard Block (CER03) 
 Data Deficient   [(no records) recorded as E vesiculosum]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Eryngium]
Name derivation:
Eryngium from the Greco-Latin 'eryngion' meaning sea holly. May also be from the Greek 'eryngano' meaning to belch, as the plant was used as a remedy for flatulence. Supinum from the Latin 'supinus' meaning bent backwards, or lying on the back; referring to the species prostrate habit.
Distribution:
Found scattered in the north-east part of South Australia, growing on temporarily flooded ground on cracking clays. Also found in the Northern Territory, Queensland and New South Wales.
Status:
Native. Uncommon in South Australia. Uncommon in the Northern Territory and New South Wales. Common in Queensland.
Plant description:
Procumbent or prostrate perennial herb with stiff, cylindrical, usually prostrate branches. Leaves almost flaccid with basal leaves flat, lanceolate, to 25 mm long and 6 mm wide, tapering into a longer (3-6 cm) tubular slender petiole, stem-leaves similar but larger (sometimes to 20 mm broad with 3 acute pungent-pointed lobes and sometimes denticulate below the lateral lobes). Flower-heads axillary, at first round, then cylindrical, to 23 mm long and 10 mm wide, bluish flowers with green or purple bracts. Flowering between September and October.
Fruit type:
Spiky, pale brown cylinder-shaped fruit-head.
Seed type:
Brown ovoid seeds to 4 mm long and 2 mm wide covered in erect thick white hair and 2-3 spikes at one end.
Embryo type:
Linear under-developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect heads that are drying and turning a straw colour. Be careful as the plant can be very prickly. Collect more than what is required as not all seeds will be viable.
Seed cleaning:
Place the heads in a tray and leave to dry for two weeks. Then rub the heads with a rubber bung and not with your hands as the heads are prickly. Then use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Use an aspirator (if available) to remove the lighter non-viable seeds from the heavy viable seeds. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was high, at 100%.
Seed germination:
Seeds are non-dormant, viable seed should germinate readily.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA 
MSB
7700 (7.4 g)
7700 (7.4 g)
60-7026-Sep-2007DJD868
Lake Eyre
19-Sep-2008100%-18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.