Seeds of South Australia
Gratwickia monochaeta (Compositae)
One-bristle Everlasting
List of species for Gratwickia
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Seed collecting:
October to December
Herbarium regions:
Lake Eyre, Nullarbor, Gairdner-Torrens, Eastern, Eyre Peninsula
NRM regions:
Alinytjara Wilurara, Eyre Peninsula, South Australian Arid Lands
IBRA regions
Myall Plains (GAW01)Gawler
 Least Concern
Gawler Volcanics (GAW02) 
 Least Concern
Gawler Lakes (GAW03) 
 Least Concern
Arcoona Plateau (GAW04) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Kingoonya (GAW05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Yellabinna (GVD06)Great Victoria Desert
 Least Concern
Nullarbor Plain (NUL02)Nullarbor
 Least Concern
Barrier Range (BHC01)Broken Hill Complex
 Data Deficient   [Most easterly occurance of spp. Highly data deficient.]
Murnpeowie (STP03)Stony Plains
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [edge of range; questionable records as Western spp]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Gratwickia]
Name derivation:
Gratwickia named after W.H Gratwick. Monochaeta from the Greek 'mono' meaning single and 'chaite' meaning bristle; referring to the single pappus bristle on the achenes.
Distribution:
Endemic to South Australia and found in the central part, growing on various sites but usually in sand.
Status:
Native. Rare in South Australia.
Plant description:
Sparingly to much-branched annual herbs to 18 cm tall and to 10 cm diameter, with several ascending stems, stems and branches sometimes purple-tinged, with a moderately dense woolly hairs and sessile glandular hairs, becoming less dense with age. Leaves narrowly oblanceolate, almost linear, with recurved margins, to 30 mm long and 2 mm broad, covered in woolly hairs, more dense on the underside. Flower-heads several in tight clusters terminating the stems and branches with bright golden-yellow flowers. Flowering between August and October.
Fruit type:
Brown daisy head.
Seed type:
Light brown ovoid seed to 0.8 mm long and 0.4 mm wide, with a single pappus bristle.
Embryo type:
Spatulate fully developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect whole heads that are drying off and turning golden brown or collect just the seeds by plucking it off with your fingers. Mature seeds are easily removed.
Seed cleaning:
Place the heads in a tray for a week to dry. Then pluck the seeds from the head with your finders. Viable seeds will be fat and brown. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was high, at 100%.
Seed germination:
Seeds are non-dormant, viable seed should germinate readily.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA 
MSB
21000 (1.01 g)
21000 (1.01 g)
1002-Nov-2009DJD1605
Eyre Peninsula
Jun-2010100%+5°C, -18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.