Seeds of South Australia
Gyrostemon ramulosus (Gyrostemonaceae)
Chinese Bush
List of species for Gyrostemon
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Seed collecting:
August to December
Herbarium regions:
North Western, Lake Eyre, Nullarbor, Gairdner-Torrens, Flinders Ranges, Eyre Peninsula
NRM regions:
Alinytjara Wilurara, Eyre Peninsula, South Australian Arid Lands
IBRA regions
SUMMARY
Eyre Hills (EYB03)Eyre Yorke Block
 Least Concern
Eyre Mallee (EYB05) 
 Least Concern
Myall Plains (GAW01)Gawler
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [edge of range]
Gawler Volcanics (GAW02) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [sand dune species]
Kingoonya (GAW05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [sand dune species]
Roxby (GAW07) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [localised]
Maralinga (GVD03)Great Victoria Desert
 Least Concern
Kintore (GVD04) 
 Least Concern
Tallaringa (GVD05) 
 Least Concern
Yellabinna (GVD06) 
 Least Concern
Nullarbor Plain (NUL02)Nullarbor
 Least Concern
Sturt Stony Desert (CHC02)Channel Country
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [limited habitat]
Lake Pure (CHC07) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Mann-Musgrave Block (CER01)Central Ranges
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Watarru (CER02) 
 Least Concern
Everard Block (CER03) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [edge of range]
IBRA regions
DISPLAY ALL
2 of 5 subregionsEyre Yorke BlockLeast Concern
4 of 8 subregionsGawlerRare
4 of 4 subregionsGreat Victoria DesertLeast Concern
Nullarbor Plain (NUL02)NullarborLeast Concern
2 of 4 subregionsChannel CountryRare
3 of 3 subregionsCentral RangesLeast Concern
, Rare
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Gyrostemon]
Name derivation:
Gyrostemon from the Greek 'gyros' meaning a circle and 'stemon' meaning a stamen; alluding to the whorled stamens. Ramulosus from the Latin 'ramulus' meaning many small branches or twigs; referring to the branching habit of the species.
Distribution:
Found mainly in the western half of South Australia with an isolated distribution in the far north-east corner, growing on sand in sandy rises and desert dunes. Also found in Western Australia, Northern Territory and Queensland.
Status:
Native. Common in South Australia. Rare in Queensland. Common in the other states. More common post fire.
Plant description:
Shrubs or trees to 5 m tall, with corky bark on the old branches. Leaves slender, to 70 mm long and 1 mm wide, pointed, terete, soft. Male flowers with recurved pedicels to 5 mm long and 5 mm across at anthesis, with the calyx distinctly lobed and the lobes acute, with numerous anthers in several whorls. Female flowers with recurved pedicels to 7 mm long, with the calyx distinctly lobed and the lobes being acute or obtuse, with usually 20-30 carpels each with a sessile stigma spreading to form a crown above the ring of ovaries. Flowering between May and September.
Fruit type:
Pale brown spherical fruit to 6 mm long formed from multiple seed segments.
Seed type:
Grey-brown reniform seeds to 2.4 mm long and 1.8 mm wide, with a rugose surface and a yellowish aril.
Embryo type:
Curved linear fully developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect fruits when the segments are about to fall apart, usually when colour changes to pale brown.
Seed cleaning:
Place the fruits in a tray and leave to dry for a week. Then rub the fruit gently by hand to dislodge the seeds from the papery wing. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed germination:
This species is generally difficult to germinate, it has morphophysiological dormancy and complex germination requirements. This species is considered a fire responsive species.