Seeds of South Australia
Hakea carinata (Proteaceae)
Erect Hakea
List of species for Hakea
Click on an image to enlarge it
Seed collecting:
January to December
Herbarium regions:
Flinders Ranges, Northern Lofty, Murray, Southern Lofty, South Eastern
NRM regions:
Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, South Australian Arid Lands, South Australian Murray-Darling Basin, South East
IBRA regions
Lucindale (NCP03)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [edge of range]
Tintinara (NCP04) 
 Least Concern
Fleurieu (KAN02)Kanmantoo
 Least Concern
Mount Lofty Ranges (FLB01)Flinders Lofty Block
 Least Concern   (Probable Decline)   [dieback (PC) & fire sensitive; susceptible to drought; projected probable decline]
Broughton (FLB02) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [vulnerable to climate change]
Southern Flinders (FLB04) 
 Least Concern
Southern Yorke (EYB01)Eyre Yorke Block
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN D)   [limestone habitat]
St Vincent (EYB02) 
 Regionally Extinct   [presumed extinct]
Murray Lakes and Coorong (MDD03)Murray Darling Depression
 Data Deficient   [edge of range, locations imprecise]
Lowan Mallee (MDD04) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [can be confused with H Mitchellii]
Wimmera (MDD05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [edge of range]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Hakea]
Name derivation:
Hakea named after Baron Christian Ludwig von Hake (1745-1818), a German horticulturalist and patron of botany. Carinata presumably from the Latin ' carina' meaning keel, however, it is not clear what is keeled the original description of the species, but may refer to the trigonous leaves of this species.
Distribution:
Endemic to South Australia and found in the southern Flinders Ranges, Mount Lofty Ranges and the upper South-east, growing in the dry sclerophyll forest and in scrub-heath, in sandy to loamy soil.
Status:
Native. Common in South Australia.
Plant description:
Erect untidy shrub to 3 m tall. Leaves broadly to narrowly linear, flat, concave or trigonous, to 240 mm long and 12 mm wide, glabrous, marginal veins prominent, midvein only or sometimes 3 longitudinal veins prominent below. Inflorescence a solitary axillary umbel with 8–24 cream-white, pink with age flowers. Flowering between September and October.
Fruit type:
Greyish-brown woody ovoid fruit to 26 mm long and 11 mm wide, with a long pointy end. Fruit split into two to reveal two seeds.
Seed type:
Dark brown to black ovoid seed to 5 mm long and 3 mm wide (12 mm long and 5 mm wide including the wing that extend narrowly down both sides of seed).
Embryo type:
Investing.
Seed collecting:
Collect mature woody fruit that are greyish-brown and not split. These will contain seeds.
Seed cleaning:
Place the woody fruit in a tray and leave to dry until it split open. Fruits can be placed in the oven at low temperatures to achieve the same result. Place the dried fruit in a bucket and shake to dislodge the seeds from the valves. Separate the seeds from the fruit and store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was high, at 90%.
Seed germination:
Seeds are non-dormant, viable seed should germinate readily without pre-treatment.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA 
MSB
8600 (95.16 g)
8600 (95.16 g)
30+10-Dec-2005KHB014
Southern Lofty
8-Aug-200690%-18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.