Seeds of South Australia
Lobelia heterophylla ssp. centralis (Campanulaceae)
Wing-seeded Lobelia
List of species for Lobelia
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Seed collecting:
September to November
Herbarium regions:
North Western, Lake Eyre
NRM regions:
Alinytjara Wilurara, South Australian Arid Lands
IBRA regions
Eyre Hills (EYB03)Eyre Yorke Block
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Talia (EYB04) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [to be changed into 2 spp.]
Eyre Mallee (EYB05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [to be changed into 2 spp.]
Gawler Volcanics (GAW02)Gawler
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [to be changed into 2 spp.]
Maralinga (GVD03)Great Victoria Desert
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [to be changed into 2 spp.]
Kintore (GVD04) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   (Probable Decline)   [buffel a threat, needs spring rain; annual]
Mann-Musgrave Block (CER01)Central Ranges
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   (Probable Decline)   [buffel a threat, needs spring rain; annual]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Lobelia]
Name derivation:
Lobelia named after Mathias de Lobel (1538-1616), physician to William of Orange and then botanist to James I of England. Heterophylla from the Greek 'heteros' meaning different and 'phyllon' meaning leaf. Centralis means central or in the middle; referring to the distribution of this subspecies, which is principally in central Australia.
Distribution:
Found in the north and north-western parts of south Australia, growing inTriodia hummock grasslands and Allocasuarina decaisneana and Acacia spp. woodlands in sand dune country. Also found in Western Australia and Northern Territory.
Status:
Native. Rare in South Australia. Uncommon in the other states. Maybe more common post fire.
Plant description:
Erect or ascending glabrous herb, to 40 cm high. Leaves linear to narrowly elliptic, to 60 mm long and 7 mm wide, entire, or occasionally with 1–3 teeth. Flower-spike to 35 mm long (to 45 mm in fruit) with pale blue to purple flowers . Hypanthium to 6 mm long and 3.5 mm wide. Calyx-lobes to 5 mm long. Corolla to 20 mm long, tubular part of corolla to 12 mm long, central lobe to 7 mm long and 4 mm wide, lateral lobes to 7 mm long and 2.5 mm wide. Flowering and fruiting between September and November.
Fruit type:
Brown ovoid capsule to 13 mm long and 8 mm diameter.
Embryo type:
Linear under-developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect mature capsules, those that are fat, turning a pale straw colour and contain brown seeds. Can collect individual capsules or break off the whole fruit spike if most capsules are matured.
Seed cleaning:
Place the capsules in a tray and leave to dry for one weeks. Then rub the capsules gently by hand to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Be careful as the seeds are very small. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.