Seeds of South Australia
Lobelia pratioides (Campanulaceae)
Poison Lobelia
List of species for Lobelia
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Seed collecting:
January to March
Herbarium region:
South Eastern
NRM region:
South East
IBRA regions
Mount Gambier (SVP02)Southern Volcanic Plain
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Glenelg Plain (NCP02)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Lucindale (NCP03) 
 Near Threatened   [localised]
Murray Lakes and Coorong (MDD03)Murray Darling Depression
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN B2ab(i,ii,iii))   (Probable Decline)
Lowan Mallee (MDD04) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   (Probable Decline)   [limited habitat]
Wimmera (MDD05) 
 Near Threatened
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Lobelia]
Name derivation:
Lobelia named after Mathias de Lobel (1538-1616), physician to William of Orange and then botanist to James I of England. Pratioides means resembling Pratia, a genus named after Charles Prat-Bernon, a midshipman on Freycinet's scientific voyage around the world, died just after departure in 1817.
Distribution:
Found in the South-east in South Australia, growing in swampy areas. Also found in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.
Status:
Native. Rare in South Australia. Rare in New South Wales and Tasmania. Common in Victoria.
Plant description:
Prostrate to decumbent perennial herbs with often fleshy adventitious roots along the branches, with short spreading hairs at least on young branches. Leaves with no stalk with a long cuneate base, to 25 mm long and 5 mm wide, with widely spaced teeth or serrations along the whole margin, with short spreading hairs on young leaves. Flowers singularly in the axils of leaf-like bracts at the apex of branches, with off-white or tinged blue flowers. Flowering between November and January.
Fruit type:
Yellow, ovoid scapsule to 5 mm long, ridged, hairy.
Seed type:
Brown ovoid seed to 0.8 mm long and 0.5 mm wide, with fine wrinkled surface.
Embryo type:
Linear under-developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect mature capsules, those that are fat, turning a pale straw colour and contain brown seeds. Can be time consuming to find mature capsules.
Seed cleaning:
Place the capsules in a tray and leave to dry for one weeks. Then rub the capsules gently by hand to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Be careful as the seeds are very small. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was high, at 100%.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA14500 (0.888 g)50+10-Feb-2011DJD2129
South Eastern
1-Jan-2012100%+5°C, -18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.