Seeds of South Australia
Adiantum capillus-veneris (Adiantaceae)
Limestone Maiden-hair
List of species for Adiantum
Click on an image to enlarge it
Herbarium regions:
Murray, Yorke Peninsula, Southern Lofty, South Eastern
NRM regions:
Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, Northern and Yorke, South Australian Murray-Darling Basin, South East
IBRA regions
Mount Gambier (SVP02)Southern Volcanic Plain
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [around Blue Lake]
Glenelg Plain (NCP02)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [habitat is stable]
Mount Lofty Ranges (FLB01)Flinders Lofty Block
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN D)   [grows on limestone or sandstone rock on alkaline soils; restricted to soaks; in Anstey Hill; checked by J Quarmby; as of May 2012 questionably native in Census]
Southern Yorke (EYB01)Eyre Yorke Block
 Data Deficient   [DD]
Murray Mallee (MDD02)Murray Darling Depression
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU B2ab(i,ii,iii))   (Probable Decline)   [occurs in areas of seepage along cliffs; needs good rainfall; sensitive to salinity; needs more survey work; extremely limited habitat]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Adiantum]
Name derivation:
Adiantum from the Greek 'adiantos' meaning unwetted, referring to the leaves remaining dry when dipped in water. Capillus-veneris from the Latin 'capillus' meaning hair and 'veneris' refers to the goddess Venus, alluding to the delicate fronds.
Distribution:
Found on the tip of the Yorke Peninsula, southern Mount Lofty Ranges, along the Murray River and in the lower South-east in South Australia, growing on limestone in erosion zones, sinkholes and wells. Also found in all mainland states and other countries.
Status:
Native. Rare in South Australia. Rare in the other states.
Plant description:
Delicate-looking, drooping fern with distinctive fan-shaped leaf segments and clustered fronds on wiry black stems.  It spreads by means of short, creeping rhizomes covered in small brown scales, which sometimes appear reddish-brown or golden. The fronds are arching and hairless, occasionally with a bluish-green or waxy tinge to the usually pale-green leaves, which are pinnate, with individual leaflets often lobed or toothed along the margins.
Fruit type:
Sori (spores) on the underside margins of the fronds between the lobes.
Seed type:
Very fine spores.
Seed collecting:
Look under the fronds and collect ones with spores and place in a seal paper bags to prevent spores from fulling out.
Seed cleaning:
Leave fronds in the paper bag to dry. The spores will fall off naturally or give the fronds a gentle shake. Use a very fine sieve to separate any unwanted material. Be careful as the spores are very fine. Store spores in an air tight container in a cool and dry place or in a -20oC freezer.