Seeds of South Australia
Mentha satureioides (Labiatae)
Creeping Mint
List of species for Mentha
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Seed collecting:
February to May
Herbarium regions:
Flinders Ranges, Eyre Peninsula, Northern Lofty, Yorke Peninsula, Southern Lofty, South Eastern
NRM regions:
Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, Eyre Peninsula, South Australian Arid Lands, South East
IBRA regions
Fleurieu (KAN02)Kanmantoo
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN D)   [2 pops known, Rockwell Ck & Eden Valley]
Mount Lofty Ranges (FLB01)Flinders Lofty Block
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU B2ab(i,ii,iii); D2)   (Probable Decline)   [grassy ecosystems; in Kaiser Stuhl; sprayed, quality of habitat degraded]
Broughton (FLB02) 
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN B2ab(i,ii,iii))   (Probable Decline)
Southern Flinders (FLB04) 
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN B2ab(i,ii,iii))   (Probable Decline)
Northern Flinders (FLB05) 
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN B2ab(i,ii,iii); D)   (Probable Decline)   [climate sensitive]
Central Flinders (FLB06) 
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN B2ab(i,ii,iii))   (Probable Decline)   [climate sensitive]
Eyre Hills (EYB03)Eyre Yorke Block
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN B2ab(i,ii,iii,iv))   (Definite Decline)   [salinity, habitat loss - threats]
Lowan Mallee (MDD04)Murray Darling Depression
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D1+2)
Wimmera (MDD05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Mentha]
Name derivation:
Mentha a Latin name of a Greek nymph who was turned into a mint plant. Satureioides means resembling the genus Satureia (which is from the Latin 'satureia' meaning savory).
Distribution:
Found scattered from the Gammon, Flinders and Mount Lofty Ranges, southern Eyre Peninsula and the upper South-east in South Australia, growing on heavy, seasonally wet soils. Also found Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria.
Status:
Native. Rare in South Australia. Common in the other states.
Plant description:
Rhizomatous, often mat-forming perennial herb with ascending or prostrate branches, often rooting at lower nodes, glabrous or covered with short spreading hairs. Leaves narrowly elliptic, to 35 mm long and 7 mm wide, surfaces glabrous, apex obtuse or rounded, margin entire. Inflorescence in clusters with 3  tubular white or pink flowers in axils of distal leaves. Flowering from November to March.
Fruit type:
Small clusters of papery brown capsules in axis of leaves.
Seed type:
Dark brown to black ovoid seed to 1.2  mm long and 0.7 mm wide, with a slightly wrinkled surface.
Embryo type:
Spatulate.
Seed collecting:
Collect individual capsules that are turning brown and contain hard seeds or break off whole stems with numerous brown capsules.
Seed cleaning:
Place the capsules in a tray and leave to dry for a week. Then rub the capsules gently with a rubber bung to dislodge the seeds from the capsules. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Some seeds will be empty.  Use an aspirator to siphon off the lighter, non-viable seeds from the heavier good seeds. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was low, at 15%.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA 
MSB
5800 (1.92 g)
5800 (1.92 g)
200+9-May-2007DJD789
South Eastern
1-Aug-200715%+5°C, -18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.