Seeds of South Australia
Pelargonium rodneyanum (Geraniaceae)
Magenta Storks-bill
List of species for Pelargonium
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Seed collecting:
January to July
Herbarium region:
South Eastern
NRM region:
South East
IBRA regions
Bridgewater (NCP01)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [edge of range]
Lucindale (NCP03) 
 Least Concern   [stronghold in SE]
Tintinara (NCP04) 
 Least Concern   [stronghold in SE]
Lowan Mallee (MDD04)Murray Darling Depression
 Least Concern
Wimmera (MDD05) 
 Least Concern   [stronghold in SE]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Pelargonium]
Name derivation:

Pelargonium from the Greek 'pelargos' meaning a stork; referring to the awned mericarp resembling a stork's bill. Rodneyanum named in honour of Mrs. Riddell of Sydney, grand-daughter of the famous  Admiral George Rodney, rather than it being named after him.

Distribution:
Found in the South-east in South Australia, growing on fertile clays or loams in grassland or woodland communities, but also on rocky outcrops. Also found in New South Wales and Victoria.
Status:
Native. Common in South Australia. Common in the other states.
Plant description:
Tufted erect perennial herb to 40 cm high, covered with short glandular hairs and with tuberous roots. Leaves  all or mostly basal, ovate, pubescent, to 5 cm long with 5-7-lobed on a long slender petioles to 7 cm long. Flowers in groups of 2-7 with magenta or deep-pink flowers, arising from the axils of the basal leaves. Flowering between November and May.
Fruit type:
Erect clusters of pale brown fruit to 25 mm long, 
Seed type:
Mericarps hairy with long twisting awns and tapering beak.
Seed collecting:
Collect matured fruit, those that are turning brown and the mericarps are starting to peel off the fruit stalk.
Seed cleaning:
Place the mericarps in a tray and leave to dry fro 1 to 2 weeks. If only the mericarps are collected, no further cleaning is required and it can be stored as is. Store the mericarps with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.