Seeds of South Australia
Phylloglossum drummondii (Lycopodiaceae)
Pigmy Club-moss
List of species for Phylloglossum
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Seed collecting:
August to November
Herbarium regions:
Eyre Peninsula, Murray, Southern Lofty, Kangaroo Island, South Eastern
NRM regions:
Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, Eyre Peninsula, Kangaroo Island, South Australian Murray-Darling Basin, South East
IBRA regions
Lucindale (NCP03)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [needs damp soil; probably undercollected]
Kangaroo Island (KAN01)Kanmantoo
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [in Flinders Chase; needs damp areas; land clearance has replaced habitat]
Fleurieu (KAN02) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   (Probable Decline)   [needs damp soil; threatened by overgrown veg in swamps]
Mount Lofty Ranges (FLB01)Flinders Lofty Block
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [needs damp soil]
Eyre Hills (EYB03)Eyre Yorke Block
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [annual]
Lowan Mallee (MDD04)Murray Darling Depression
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [historical habitat loss; limited population; threats: ground water use, agroforestry]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Phylloglossum]
Name derivation:
Phylloglossum from the Greek 'phyllon' meaning leaf and 'glossa' meaning tongue; possibly referring to the strobilus sticking out like a tongue from the rosetted leaves.. Drummondii named after James Drummond (1786-1863), a Scottish born botanist and naturalist who was the curator of the government gardens in Cork, Ireland and an early settler in Western Australia.
Distribution:
Found on the tip of the Eyre Peninsula, Kangaroo Island, southern Mount Lofty Ranges and the South-east, growing on moist sandy or clay soil, particularly after fire. Also found in Western Australia, Victoria and Tasmania.
Status:
Native. Rare in South Australia. Rare in Tasmania. Common in the other states.
Plant description:
Tuberous, perennial grass-like herb to 5 cm tall. Tuber whitish, covered with papery scales, usually with one lateral root. Leaves usually less than 10, rosetted at apex of tuber, linear, to 2 cm long, fleshy. Strobili (a cone-like structure consisting of sporophylls) terminal to 7 mm long, on leafless, fleshy stalk up to 4 cm long. Grow during winter and spring 
Fruit type:
Sporophylls spirally arranged, closely overlapping, spreading when ripe, broadly ovate-triangular. Sporangia in axil of each sporophyll, broad, kidney-shaped, pale yellow.
Seed type:
Pale yellow broad kidney-shaped sporangia in axil of each sporophyll.
Seed collecting:
Collect strobili that are turning yellow, these will contain mature sporohylls with spores. Place them in a seal paper bag to prevent spores from fulling out.
Seed cleaning:
Leave fronds in the paper bag to dry. The spores will fall off naturally or give the fronds a gentle shake. Use a very fine sieve to separate any unwanted material. Be careful as the spores are very fine. Store spores in an air tight container in a cool and dry place or in a -20oC freezer.