Seeds of South Australia
Pultenaea graveolens (Leguminosae)
Scented Bush-pea
List of species for Pultenaea
Display more images
Click on an image to enlarge it
Seed collecting:
December
Herbarium regions:
Flinders Ranges, Southern Lofty, Kangaroo Island
NRM regions:
Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, Kangaroo Island, South Australian Arid Lands
IBRA regions
Kangaroo Island (KAN01)Kanmantoo
 Regionally Extinct   [1 old record, 1905; presumed extinct]
Fleurieu (KAN02) 
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [localised; Spring Mt, Inman Valley]
Mount Lofty Ranges (FLB01)Flinders Lofty Block
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [localised; T Jury: could be declining along roadsides]
Southern Flinders (FLB04) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Pultenaea]
Name derivation:
Pultenaea named after Richard Pulteney (1730 – 1801), an English physician, botanist and biographer of Carl Linnaeus. Graveolens from the Latin 'gravis' meaning heavy and 'oleo' meaning smell; alluding to the plants having strong perfume.
Distribution:
Found in the southern Flinders Range and the southern Mount Lofty Ranges in South Australia, with a single record from Kangaroo Island, growing in dry sclerophyll woodland. Also found in Victoria.
Status:
Native. Rare in South Australia. Rare in Victoria.
Plant description:
Resinous, strongly perfumed shrub to 1.5 m high with pendulous branches and terete stems covered with short, spreading hairs. Leaves alternate, ovate, to 25 mm long and 3 mm wide, apex acute, not pungent, upper surface with pale hairs, lower surface scabrous with tubercle-based hairs, darker than upper surface. Inflorenscences axillary toward tips of short, lateral branches with yellow pea-flowers. Flowering in October. 
Fruit type:
Hairy brown ovoid pod.
Seed type:
Shiny black reniform seed to 4 mm long and 1.5 mm wide, with a cream aril.
Embryo type:
Bent.
Seed collecting:
Collect maturing pods, those that are brown or turning brown and contain hard black seeds inside.
Seed cleaning:
Place the pods in a paper bag and leave to dry for one to two weeks. Then rub the pods with a rubber bung to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From three collections, the seed viability were average to high, ranging from 60% to 100%.
Seed germination:
Place the pods in a paper bag and leave to dry for one to two weeks. Then rub the pods with a rubber bung to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA18000 (31.43 g)50+14-Dec-2007KHB117
Southern Lofty
19-Sep-200860%-18°C
BGA680 (2.35 g)20+10-Dec-2007PJA162
Southern Lofty
19-Sep-2008100%-18°C
BGA 
MSB
3200 (12.6 g)
3200 (12.6 g)
250+16-Dec-2007KHB97B
Flinders Ranges
19-Sep-200885%-18°C
TST6771-Jan-2012-18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.