Seeds of South Australia
Rhodanthe gossypina (Compositae)
Cottony Paper-daisy
List of species for Rhodanthe
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Seed collecting:
September to November
Herbarium region:
Lake Eyre
NRM region:
South Australian Arid Lands
IBRA region
Coongie (CHC06)Channel Country
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [edge of range]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Rhodanthe]
Name derivation:
Rhodanthe from the Greek 'rhodon' meaning a rose and 'anthos' meaning a flower; referring to the rose-like flowers of Rhodanthe manglesii, the type for the genus. Goosypina from the Latinised form of the Arabic name 'goz' for a soft substance (cotton), referring to the cotton-like hairs covering the plant.
Distribution:
Found in the far north-eastern corner of South Australia, growing on heavy soil in open situations that is frequently flooded. Also found in the Northern Territory and Queensland.
Status:
Native. Rare in South Australia. Rare in the Northern Territory. Common in Queensland.
Plant description:
Erect annual herb to 20 cm high covered in cotton-like hairs. Leaves linear to narrow-oblong to 4 cm long and 5 mm wide. Inflorescence in terminal clusters with paper daisy flowers. Flowering between June and September. This species is similar to Rhodanthe corymbiflora and R. microglossa from which it can be distinguished having a more open inflorescence, smaller involucre with bract-lamina about halft as long, having dark resinous hairs on the stereome of the inner bracts and having a smooth throat to the corolla.
Fruit type:
Brown fluffy daisy head.
Seed type:
Brown oblong seed to 2.3 mm long and 0.7 mm wide, covered in pale brown hairs and long pappus.
Embryo type:
Spatulate fully developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect heads that are matured, those that are drying off, fat, turning a straw colour seeds and seeds come off easily if you pull it out with your fingers.
Seed cleaning:
Place the heads in a tray and leave to dry for a week. Then rub the heads gently by hand or with a rubber bung to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was average, at 70%.
Germination table:
DateResultT0T50Pre-treatment | Germination medium | Incubator: Photoperiod / Thermoperiod
May-177%21NA 500 mg/L gibberellic acid for 24 h;
1% agar;
Incubated under winter conditions
May-170%NANA 500 mg/L gibberellic acid for 24 h;
1% agar;
Incubated under spring/autumn conditions
Result: Maximum percentage of germination observed.
T0: Number of days before first germinant observed.
T50: Number of days to achieve 50% germination.
Pre-treatment: The initial treatment that the seeds received prior to placement on germination media.
Germination medium: The substrate that seeds were placed on for the duration of the germination experiment.
Incubator conditions:
Photoperiod: The duration of light exposure that the seeds were subject to during a 24 hour period.
Thermoperiod: The constant or diurnal temperatures that seeds were subject to during a 24 hour period.
Winter conditions: 15°C 20 h (3am→11pm); 5°C 4 h (11pm→3am) / 10 h light (8am→6pm); 14 h dark (6pm→8am)
Spring/Autumn conditions: 22°C 12 h (8am→8pm); 10°C 12 h (8pm→8am) / 12 h light (8am→8pm); 12 h dark (8pm→8am)
Summer conditions: 30°C 14 h (6am→8pm); 15°C 10 h (8pm→6am) / 14 h light (6am→8pm); 10 h dark (8pm→6am)