Seeds of South Australia
Triglochin trichophora (Juncaginaceae)
Small-spurred Arrowgrass
List of species for Triglochin
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Seed collecting:
August to December
Herbarium regions:
Eyre Peninsula, Yorke Peninsula, Southern Lofty, Kangaroo Island, South Eastern
NRM regions:
Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, Eyre Peninsula, Kangaroo Island, Northern and Yorke, South East
IBRA regions
Lucindale (NCP03)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)
Kangaroo Island (KAN01)Kanmantoo
 Near Threatened   [coastal sp]
Fleurieu (KAN02) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [small pops]
Mount Lofty Ranges (FLB01)Flinders Lofty Block
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [under-represented; coastal; in Aldinga Scrub]
Southern Yorke (EYB01)Eyre Yorke Block
 Least Concern   (Probable Decline)
St Vincent (EYB02) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA ab)   (Definite Decline)   [saline areas around coast]
Eyre Hills (EYB03) 
 Least Concern   [records not databased]
Talia (EYB04) 
 Least Concern   [records not databased]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Triglochin]
Name derivation:
Triglochin from the Greek 'treis' meaning three and 'glochis' meaning a point; referring to its three-sided carpels. Trichophora from the Greek 'thrix' or 'trichos' meaning hair and the suffix '-phorus' meaning carry or bearing; Possible referring to the minute spurs at the base of the carpels.
Distribution:
Found in the southern part of South Australia, from the Nullarbor to the lower South-east, growing in coastal or near coastal areas on sands and calcareous soils. Also found in Western Australia and Victoria.
Status:
Native. Uncommon in South Australia. Very rare in Victoria. Common in Western Australia.
Plant description:
Slender annual herb to 13 cm high. Leaves flat and thread-like, to 8 cm long, shorter than the inflorescence. Inflorescence an erect, ascending or spreading spike to 13 cm long, fruiting part at top to 6 cm long, with 4–49 fruits. Flowering between June and October.
Fruit type:
Purple to Straw-coloured oblong fruit to 3.2 mm long and 1.8 mm wide, taped at apex and contracted at base, on stalk to 2 mm long, with six seed segments (carpels), 3 fertile alternating with 3 undeveloped sterile ones.
Seed type:
Purple to straw-coloured wedge-shaped or almost cylindrical seed, with 2 short lateral spurs or points to 0.02 mm long at the base, connected by a membrane between the spurs.  
Embryo type:
Linear.
Seed collecting:
Collect mature fruits either by breaking off individual spikes or by removing plants that are drying off with fruits that are purple to straw-colour and seed segments coming apart easily.
Seed cleaning:
Place the fruit spikes in a tray and leave to dry for 1 to 2 weeks. Then rub the dried fruit spikes with a rubber bung to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate any unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.