Seeds of South Australia
Triglochin turrifera (Juncaginaceae)
Rocket-fruit Arrowgrass
List of species for Triglochin
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Seed collecting:
September to November
Herbarium region:
South Eastern
NRM region:
South East
IBRA region
Tintinara (NCP04)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [used to be known as turriferrum]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Triglochin]
Name derivation:
Triglochin from the Greek 'treis' meaning three and 'glochis' meaning a point; referring to its three-sided carpels. Turrifera from the Latin 'turris' meaning tower and the suffix '-fera' meaning bearing; referring to its tower or rocket-shaped fruit.
Distribution:
Found in the upper South-east in South Australia, growing on wet soils in small temporary streams, roadside pools, gilgais and depression on granite outcrops. Also found in New South Wales and Victoria.
Status:
Native. Very rare in South Australia. Uncommon in New South Wales. Common in Victoria.
Plant description:
Small annual herb to 14 cm high. Leaves flat and thread-like, to 14 cm long, usually longer than the inflorescence. Inflorescence an erect, ascending or spreading spike to 4.5 cm long, fruiting part at the top to 4 cm long, with 5–14 fruits. Flowering between July and September.
Fruit type:
Straw-coloured  6-sided rocket-shaped fruit to 5 mm long and 2 mm wide, stalkless or on very short stalk with 3 seed segments, all fertile and completely united and with 2 lateral thickened spurs to 1 mm long at the base.
Seed type:
Same as for the fruit.
Embryo type:
Linear.
Seed collecting:
Collect mature fruits either by breaking off individual spikes or by removing plants that are drying off with fruits that are straw-colour and seed segments coming apart easily.
Seed cleaning:
Place the fruit spikes in a tray and leave to dry for 1 to 2 weeks. Then use you fingers to remove the dried fruit from the spikes. Use a sieve to separate any unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was high, at 100%.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA1050 (2 g)50+21-Oct-2008DJD1353
South Eastern
20-Jul-2009100%-18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.