Seeds of South Australia
Wurmbea dioica ssp. brevifolia (Liliaceae)
Pink-edged Star-lily
List of species for Wurmbea
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Seed collecting:
August to November
Herbarium regions:
Nullarbor, Flinders Ranges, Eastern, Eyre Peninsula, Northern Lofty, Murray, Yorke Peninsula, Southern Lofty, Kangaroo Island, South Eastern
NRM regions:
Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, Alinytjara Wilurara, Eyre Peninsula, Kangaroo Island, Northern and Yorke, South Australian Arid Lands, South Australian Murray-Darling Basin, South East
IBRA regions
SUMMARY
Bridgewater (NCP01)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Lucindale (NCP03) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Fleurieu (KAN02)Kanmantoo
 Near Threatened   [undercollected]
Mount Lofty Ranges (FLB01)Flinders Lofty Block
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)
Northern Flinders (FLB05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   (Probable Decline)
Central Flinders (FLB06) 
 Least Concern
Eyre Hills (EYB03)Eyre Yorke Block
 Least Concern
Talia (EYB04) 
 Least Concern
Eyre Mallee (EYB05) 
 Least Concern
Murray Mallee (MDD02)Murray Darling Depression
 Least Concern
Murray Lakes and Coorong (MDD03) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Lowan Mallee (MDD04) 
 Near Threatened
Myall Plains (GAW01)Gawler
 Least Concern
Gawler Volcanics (GAW02) 
 Least Concern
Yellabinna (GVD06)Great Victoria Desert
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Nullarbor Plain (NUL02)Nullarbor
 Least Concern
Yalata (NUL03) 
 Least Concern
IBRA regions
DISPLAY ALL
2 of 4 subregionsNaracoorte Coastal PlainRare
Fleurieu (KAN02)KanmantooNear Threatened
  [undercollected]
3 of 6 subregionsFlinders Lofty BlockLeast Concern
, Rare
, Vulnerable
3 of 5 subregionsEyre Yorke BlockLeast Concern
3 of 6 subregionsMurray Darling DepressionLeast Concern
, Near Threatened
, Rare
2 of 8 subregionsGawlerLeast Concern
Yellabinna (GVD06)Great Victoria DesertRare
  (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
2 of 3 subregionsNullarborLeast Concern
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Wurmbea]
Name derivation:
Wurmbea name after Friedrick Wilhelm von Wurmb, merchant and botanist in 18th century Batavia (Jakarta). Dioica from Latin meaning two houses; referring to the species having male and female flowers on separate plants. Brevifolia from the Latin 'brevis' meaning short and 'folium'  meaning a leaf; referring to the subspecies comparatively short upper leaf.
Distribution:
Found in the southern part of South Australia, growing in wide range of habitats from coastal limestone and mallee, to mountain tops and rock outcrops. Also found in New South Wales and Victoria.
Status:
Native. Common in South Australia. Common in the other states.
Plant description:
Dioecious herb to 20 cm high. Leaves 3, alternate, the lowest leaf linear-lanceolate, elongate, to 15 cm long and 5 mm wide, erect, middle leaf similar or shorter and with an inflated base, upper leaf just below the inflorescence, somewhat ovate and swollen to 2 cm long, as wide as long, not elongated as in the other leaves. Inflorescence spike with 1–6, unisexual, rarely bisexual flowers, female flowers distinctly smaller, male flowers white or cream, female flowers often turning pink with age, tepals more rounded, nectary a single continuous horizontal band of purple, stamens on male plants only, white, anther purple, ovary ovoid, often turning purple. This subspecies differ from the other two subspecies found in South Australia by the short, ovate uppermost leaf that lacks an elongated apex, and pink-edged tepals. Flowering between June and September, usually earlier than W. dioica ssp. dioica where the two grow together.
Fruit type:
Brown papery ovoid capsule containing many seeds.
Embryo type:
Linear under-developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect mature capsules, those turning pale straw colour and containing hard brown seeds. 
Seed cleaning:
Place the capsules in a tray and leave to dry for two weeks. Then rub the capsules gently by hand to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.