Seeds of South Australia
Wurmbea uniflora (Liliaceae)
Single-flower Star-lily
List of species for Wurmbea
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Seed collecting:
November to January
Herbarium regions:
Southern Lofty, South Eastern
NRM regions:
Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges, South East
IBRA regions
Mount Gambier (SVP02)Southern Volcanic Plain
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN B2ab(i,ii,iii))   (Probable Decline)   [Only record, in quarry near summit Mt McIntyre]
Mount Lofty Ranges (FLB01)Flinders Lofty Block
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN B2ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v))   (Probable Decline)   [in Mt Bold only known from 3 sites; blackberry, climate change, habitat destruction - threats]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Wurmbea]
Name derivation:
Wurmbea name after Friedrick Wilhelm von Wurmb, merchant and botanist in 18th century Batavia (Jakarta). Uniflora from the Latin 'unus' meaning one and 'floris' meaning flower.
Distribution:
Known from one location in South Australia in the southern Mount Lofty Ranges with an old collection from the lower South-east, growing in fertile moist loam in grassy woodland. Also found in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.
Status:
Native. Very rare in South Australia. Rare in New South Wales. Uncommon in Victoria. Common in Tasmania.
Plant description:
Small herb to 14 cm tall. Leaves 3, well spaced, lowest one narrow-linear, to 10 cm long and 2 mm broad, not dilated at base, middle one shorter, filiform or narrow-linear, dilated at base, uppermost one much shorter with markedly dilated base and a short to long acuminate apex, attached well below inflorescence. Inflorescence usually single, rarely 2, tiny white hermaphrodite flower, faintly purple tinged with age. Nectaries 2 per segment, well separated, stamens greater than half length of tepals, anthers yellow. Flowering between September to January.
Fruit type:
Brown papery ovoid capsule to 1 cm long containing many seeds.
Seed type:
Orange brown globular seed to 1.5 mm diameter.
Embryo type:
Linear under-developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect mature capsules, those turning pale straw colour and containing hard brown seeds. 
Seed cleaning:
Place the capsules in a tray and leave to dry for two weeks. Then rub the capsules gently by hand to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From four collections, the seed viability were high, ranging from 90% to 100%.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA 
MSB
2457+2345 (2.85+2.72 g)
6250 (7.2 g)
>10022-Dec-2004MKJ 58
Southern Lofty
28-Mar-2006100%+5°C, -18°C
BGA1700 (1.67 g)1-Dec-2006DJD612
Southern Lofty
1-Aug-200790%-18°C
BGA12000 (15.68 g)100+4-Dec-2007TST260
Southern Lofty
20-Jul-2009100%+5°C, -18°C
BGA12700 (14.9 g)100+4-Dec-2007TST248
Southern Lofty
20-Jul-2009100%+5°C, -18°C
Tim Jury1-Jan-2012+5°C, -18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.