Seeds of South Australia
Baloskion tetraphyllum ssp. tetraphyllum (Restionaceae)
Feather Plant
List of species for Baloskion
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Seed collecting:
January to February
Herbarium region:
South Eastern
NRM region:
South East
IBRA regions
Mount Gambier (SVP02)Southern Volcanic Plain
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU D2)   [blackberries a threat]
Glenelg Plain (NCP02)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Baloskion]
Name derivation:
Tetraphyllum from the Greek 'tetra' meaning four and 'phyllon' meaning leaf; referring to the female perianth-segments.
Distribution:
Very limited occurrences in the lower South-east of South Australia, between Millicent and Mount Gambier, usually in swamping areas. Also found in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.
Status:
Native. Very rare in South Australia. Rare in New South Wales. Common in other states.
Plant description:
Dioecious perennial herb with stiff, slender and cylindrical stems, with sheathing bracts appressed, becoming brown, middle bracts producing filiform much-divided barren branches to 15cm long, the barren branchlets with minute distant leaves or scales. Spikelets several-flowered, ovoid to nearly globular, to 10mm long. Male perianth-segments 6, unequal. Female perianth-segments 4, the 2 outer ones lanceolate and folded. 
Fruit type:
Long red brown heads containing numerous papery, horse-shoe crab shape fruit. 
Seed type:
Tiny, yellow orange, elliptical seed less than 1mm long.
Embryo type:
Broad.
Seed collecting:
Collection mature heads, those turning brown. Either cut the whole heads or strip the fruit from the heads with your hands.
Seed cleaning:
Place the heads in a tray and leave to dry for one to two weeks. Then rub the heads gently with a rubber bung to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Be very careful as the seeds are very small. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was high, at 85%.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA 
MSB
129167+125880 (27.9+27.19 g)
250000 (54.3 g)
>6020-Jan-2005MKJ 69
South Eastern
28-Mar-200685%+5°C, -18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.