Seeds of South Australia
Bergia pedicellaris (Elatinaceae)
Long Stalk Water-fire
List of species for Bergia
Display more images
Click on an image to enlarge it
Seed collecting:
May to July
Herbarium region:
Lake Eyre
NRM region:
South Australian Arid Lands
IBRA regions
Strzelecki Desert (SSD05)Simpson Strzelecki Dunefields
 Near Threatened   [flood sp]
Sturt Stony Desert (CHC02)Channel Country
 Near Threatened   [flood sp]
Coongie (CHC06) 
 Near Threatened   [(no records), flood sp]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Bergia]
Name derivation:
Bergia named after Dr Petter Jonas Bergius (1730-90), Swedish physician and botanist. Pedicellaris means with little pedicels; referring to the prominent long pedicels of this species.
Distribution:
Few records from the north-east corner of South Australia, growing on cracking clay soils, rarely on alluvial sandy soils. Also found in Western Australia, Northern Territory and Queensland.
Status:
Native. Uncommon in South Australia. Common in other states.
Plant description:
Spreading or erect annual herb to 30 cm high. Leaves elliptic to narrow-elliptic, to 35 mm long and 11 mm wide, acute, glandular hairy on midvein and at base, margin serrate, mid-vein prominent. Flowers single or paired, green or pink. Bracteoles at base of pedicels, narrow-triangular, to 1 mm long and 0.1 mm wide. Sepals 5, ovate, to 3.5 mm long and 1.5 mm wide, acuminate, glandular-pubescent, margin with a fringe. 
Fruit type:
Brown globular capsule to 3.5 mm diameter.
Seed type:
Slightly curved, brown, ovoid seed to 0.5mm long with a smooth and shiny surface.
Embryo type:
Linear.
Seed collecting:
Collect whole plant with maturing capsules, those turning brown and contain brown seeds.
Seed cleaning:
Place the plant in a tray and leave to dry for one to two weeks. Then rub the plant especially the capsules gently by hand to dislodge the seeds. Use a fine sieve to separate the unwanted material. Be very careful as the seeds are very small. The seeds are shiny brown. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From one collection, the seed viability was average, at 65%.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA 
MSB
60000 (0.22 g)
60000 (0.22 g)
508-May-2007RJB71581
Lake Eyre
1-Aug-200765%-18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.