Seeds of South Australia
Brachyscome blackii (Compositae)
Black's Daisy
List of species for Brachyscome
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Seed collecting:
September to November
Herbarium region:
North Western
NRM region:
Alinytjara Wilurara
IBRA regions
Kintore (GVD04)Great Victoria Desert
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [buffel grass potential threat]
Witjira (STP06)Stony Plains
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [check ID]
Mann-Musgrave Block (CER01)Central Ranges
 Least Concern   [buffel grass potential threat]
Watarru (CER02) 
 Least Concern   [buffel grass potential threat]
Tieyon (FIN03)Finke
 Data Deficient   [questionable record]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Brachyscome]
Name derivation:
Brachyscome from the Greek 'brachys' meaning short and 'kome' meaning hair; referring to the short bristles or hairs of the pappus. Blackii named after John McConnell Black (1855–1951), a Scottish born South Australian botanist and author of first Flora of South Australia.
Distribution:
Found in the far north-western corner in South Australia, growing among rocks on ridges and cliffs and on stony ground. Also found in Western Australia and the Northern Territory.
Status:
Native. Uncommon in South Australia. Uncommon in Western Australia. Common in the Northern Territory.
Plant description:
Perennial woody herb to 40 cm high with hairy branches. Leaves sessile, ovate to elliptic in outline, pinnatifid, glandular hairy, to 20 mm long and  7 mm wide. Inflorescence on long stalk above leaves with pale blue to mauve ray florets and yellow disc florets. Flowering between August and September.
Fruit type:
Brown daisy heads.
Embryo type:
Spatulate fully developed.
Seed collecting:
Pick heads that are maturing, drying off, with brown seeds that dislodge easily.
Seed cleaning:
Place the seed-heads in a tray and leave to dry for a week. Then gently rub the heads by hand to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.