Seeds of South Australia
Callitriche sonderi (Callitrichaceae)
Matted Water Starwort
List of species for Callitriche
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Seed collecting:
January to December
Herbarium regions:
Lake Eyre, Murray, South Eastern
NRM regions:
South Australian Arid Lands, South Australian Murray-Darling Basin, South East
IBRA regions
Mount Lofty Ranges (FLB01)Flinders Lofty Block
 Data Deficient   [1 record, Millbrook Reservoir, possible introduction]
Murray Mallee (MDD02)Murray Darling Depression
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU B2ab(i,ii,iii); C2a(i))   (Probable Decline)
Wimmera (MDD05) 
 Vulnerable   (IUCN: VU B2ab(i,ii,iii))   (Probable Decline)   [likes swamp edges, needs fresh water]
Murray Scroll Belt (RIV06)Riverina
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [comes & goes]
Breakaways (STP01)Stony Plains
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [undercollected, very small, occurs in large numbers in floods]
Oodnadatta (STP02) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [undercollected, very small, occurs in large numbers in floods]
Witjira (STP06) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [undercollected, very small, occurs in large numbers in floods]
Sturt Stony Desert (CHC02)Channel Country
 Near Threatened   [undercollected, very small, occurs in large numbers in floods]
Coongie (CHC06) 
 Least Concern   [undercollected, very small, occurs in large numbers in floods]
Lake Pure (CHC07) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [undercollected, very small, occurs in large numbers in floods]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Callitriche]
Name derivation:
Callitriche from the Greek 'kallos' meaning beautiful and 'thrix' or 'trikhos' meaning hair; referring to the beautiful hairy stems. Sonderi named after Dr. Otto Wilhelm Sonder (1812-1881), a German botanist, pharmacist and editor of Flora Capensis.
Distribution:
Found in the far north-east, Murray River and the South-east in South Australia, growing on river flood plains or other places subject to periodic inundation. Also found in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.
Status:
Native. Rare in South Australia. Very rare in Tasmania. Common in the other states.
Plant description:
Mostly terrestrial, mat-forming herb. Leaves linear-obovate, to 5 mm long and 1.5 mm wide, obscurely 3-veined. Upper leaves not rosetted. Flowers usually paired, a male and female together in opposite axils. Bracteoles linear-triangular, to 0.5 mm long, deciduous, stamen to 1 mm long, not elongating as fruit ripens, filament shorter than ripe fruit, styles erect, to 0.3 mm long, persistent.
Fruit type:
Dark-brown to greyish fruit, almost cordate in outline, to 0.6 mm long and 0.8 mm wide, keeled and only very weakly winged.
Seed type:
Tiny dark brown to black ovoid seed to 0.6 mm long and 0.4 mm wide, with a wrinkled surface.
Seed collecting:
Collect mature capsules, those that are turning a pale straw colour and contain hard seeds. Can collect individual capsules or break off the whole stems.
Seed cleaning:
Place the capsules in a tray and leave to dry for two weeks. Then rub the capsules gently by hand to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.