Seeds of South Australia
Calotis lappulacea (Compositae)
Yellow Burr-daisy
List of species for Calotis
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Seed collecting:
January to December
Herbarium regions:
Flinders Ranges, Eastern, Eyre Peninsula, Murray
NRM regions:
Eyre Peninsula, South Australian Arid Lands, South Australian Murray-Darling Basin
IBRA regions
Olary Spur (FLB03)Flinders Lofty Block
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [grazing a threat]
Southern Flinders (FLB04) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))
Northern Flinders (FLB05) 
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   (Probable Decline)   [localised]
Central Flinders (FLB06) 
 Near Threatened   (Probable Decline)
Eyre Hills (EYB03)Eyre Yorke Block
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))   [Could be introduced]
South Olary Plain (MDD01)Murray Darling Depression
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(i,ii))
Bimbowrie (BHC05)Broken Hill Complex
 Rare   (IUCN: RA d(ii))   [Grazing a threat]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Calotis]
Name derivation:
Calotis from the Greek 'kalos' meaning beautiful and 'otos' meaning ear; after the first species named in the genus Calotis cuneifolia which has an ear-shaped pappus. Lappulacea from the Latin 'lappa' meaning burr; alluding to the burr-like fruit.
Distribution:
Found in the central part of South Australia, between Lake Torrens and Lake Frome south to Peterborough. Also found in all other mainland states.
Status:
Native. Uncommon in South Australia. Rare in the Northern Territory. Uncommon in Victoria. Common in the other states.
Plant description:
Perennial herb or undershrub to 50 cm high with hairy, erect, much-branched, wiry stems, becoming woody in the lower part. Base leaves petiolate, cuneate, toothed or pinnatifid, to 6 cm long and 8 mm wide, soon withering. Stem leaves sessile, linear to oblanceolate, entire to pinnatifid, to 2.5 cm long and 4 mm wide, narrowed at the base, scabrous-pubescent. Flower-head in very loose leafy terminal cymes with solitary or 2-4 flowers, ray florets yellow. Flowering much of the year.
Fruit type:
Brown round spiny fruit-head.
Seed type:
Yellow-brown pyrimid-shaped seed to 2 mm long, with numerous barbed spines at one end.
Embryo type:
Spathulate fully developed.
Seed collecting:
Collect mature seed heads that are dried and turning brown by picking off the heads and placing them in a paper bag. Be careful as the heads are spiny.
Seed cleaning:
Leave the heads in the paper bag to dry for at least a week. No further cleaning required if only the heads are collected. If other material were collected, use a sieve to separate the unwanted material. Whole heads can be stored with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed germination:
Seeds are non-dormant, viable seed should germinate readily.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGA6500 (4.83 g)20+13-Mar-2010KHB386
Flinders Ranges
Jun-201030%-18°C
BGA60000 (21.82 g)300+9-Dec-2009KHB337
Flinders Ranges
Jun-201040%-18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.