Seeds of South Australia
Cassinia tegulata (Compositae)
Avenue Cassinia
List of species for Cassinia
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Seed collecting:
April to June
Herbarium region:
South Eastern
NRM region:
South East
IBRA region
Bridgewater (NCP01)Naracoorte Coastal Plain
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN D)   [checked D Duval]
Lucindale (NCP03) 
 Endangered   (IUCN: EN D)   [checked D Duval]
RSCA map:
Regional Species Conservation Assessments per IBRA subregion. Please click the thumbnail map.
AVH map:
Australian distribution map (external link)
SA Census:
Census of South Australian plants (external link)     [genus Cassinia]
Name derivation:
Cassinia named after Alexandre-Henri Gabriel de Cassini (1782-1832), a French botanist who published extensively on the Compositae. Tegulata from the Latin 'tegula' meaning a tile; referring to the scale-like involucral bracts.
Distribution:
Found in the South-east in South Australia, growing in Melaleuca brevifolia and Gahnia filum shrubland in inter-dune flats with shallow grey or yellowish sandy clay soils over limestone which are seasonally inundated. Also found in Victoria.
Status:
Native. Very rare in South Australia. Very rare in Victoria.
Plant description:
A small to medium-sized shrub with an upright habit, grey-green to yellowish green, hairy, needle-like leaves, fissured brown bark and off-white to cream flowers at the end of branches. Flowers are honey-scented, but leaves and stems are odourless and not sticky. Flowering between February and April.
Fruit type:
Light grey, dense round daisy-head.
Seed type:
Brown cylindrical seed to 1 mm long and 0.3 mm wide, with long white pappus at one end.
Embryo type:
Spatulate.
Seed collecting:
Collect heads that are matured, greyish and contain brown seeds.
Seed cleaning:
Place the heads in a tray for one to two week to dry. Then rub the heads gently with your hands to dislodge the seeds. Use a sieve to separate any unwanted material. Viable seeds will be small and brown. Store the seeds with a desiccant such as dried silica beads or dry rice, in an air tight container in a cool and dry place.
Seed viability:
From five collections, the seed viability were average to high, ranging from 75% to 100%.
Seed germination:
Seeds are non-dormant, viable seed should germinate readily.
Seeds stored:
LocationNo. of seeds
(weight grams)
Number
of plants
Date
collected
Collection number
Collection location
Date
stored
% ViabilityStorage
temperature
BGAapproY 460000 (91.76 g)26-May-2005DJD 132 - uncleaned sublot
South Eastern
14-Sep-2006+5°C, -18°C
BGA81000 (7.36 g)40-5010-Apr-2006DJD449
South Eastern
14-Sep-200675%-18°C
BGA2000 (0.14 g)40+17-May-2009CRD16
South Eastern
20-Jul-2009100%-18°C
BGA19000 (1.58 g)1528-May-2009TST736
South Eastern
20-Jul-2009100%-18°C
BGA2000 (0.14 g)40+17-May-2009CRD16
South Eastern
20-Jul-2009100%-18°C
TST7361-Jan-2012-18°C
Location: BGA — the seeds are stored at the Adelaide Botanic Gardens, MSB — the seeds are stored at the Millennium Seed Bank, Kew, England.
Number of plants: This is the number of plants from which the seeds were collected.
Collection location: The Herbarium of South Australia's region name.
% Viability: Percentage of filled healthy seeds determined by a cut test or x-ray.